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Galician, Asturian etc short info needed

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finngaitero
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Galician, Asturian etc short info needed

Post by finngaitero » Sun Feb 14, 2010 10:02 am

Hola all,
Have to hold lecture about bagpipes, and Galician is one main point becouse I play it, BUT
need some good nice small info about Galician and Asturian + portugese ..?? bagpipes history
How did they developed like these are now today ,so , when ,where.. why
and if u have some personal points about above pipes, it will be much better than take info straigth from internet.
Kiitos,
Mikko

oregaiteiro
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Re: Galician, Asturian etc short info needed

Post by oregaiteiro » Sun Feb 14, 2010 5:04 pm

Hey Mikko - there is of course a lot of stuff on the net, but what always interests me is what is not known clearly. There are depictions of Gaitas in Spain and in Galicia going back 1000 years, that look substantially the same as the ones today, i.e., with one drone and a conical chanter. This is, incidentally, far earlier than any mention of pipes in Scotland, where the best guess has them showing about in the 1300's or 1400's.

Looking art the representations in art and architecture, it seems there were different types of pipes played. This certainly matches what has been found by research today by people like Pablo Carpintero, who has a wonderful collection of different Galician bagpipes, showing that they varied in pitch, number of drones, and intonation from local region to region. It seems that most, but not all, older pipes were played in the closed style, the way the Asturian pipes still are played today. Some of Carpintero's pipes have one drone, some two, some have a palleta reeded chillon, some , like Luife's new replica instrument, have two drones ina common stock. Some are even bellows blown. It would seem that there was some influence from other parts of Europe - possibly two way influence, as of course bagpipes were popular in most rural parts of Europe. There are even examples of pipes made out of cane, and no drone pipes, with single reed chanter pipes.

I am always faxcinated by the connections, if any, between the Galician pipes and those played in Ireland and Scotland and England. There were trading connections from the earliest times, and cultural exchanges had to have been occurring. In Chaucers writing, one of the pilgrims plays the bagpipe, a one drone model I believe.

Wish I could be of more help. Good luck.
Kevin

Art
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Re: Galician, Asturian etc short info needed

Post by Art » Tue Feb 16, 2010 1:22 am

My understanding is that we don't know much about the origins of the bagpipes, but they were (and still are) found in many locations.

One thing that intrigues me is the possibility of the bagpipes having spread as a result of the cultural and mercantile contacts that occurred due to the pilgramages on the Camino of Santiago (Saint James' Way). I suppose something similar may have happened with the pilgrimages talked about in the Canterbury Tales.

I didn't know about the bellows being used in Spain. That's interesting!

John Cunningham
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Re: Galician, Asturian etc short info needed

Post by John Cunningham » Wed Feb 17, 2010 1:18 am

The "Cantigas de Santa Maria", collected by King Alfonso X of Castille in the 13th century, contain pictures or "illuminations" of instruments in use in those days. Here's a website with many of the instruments - http://www.pbm.com/~lindahl/cantigas/images/ - There's a bellows in use in a small organ in Number 200; #220 a mouth blown bagpipe with 2 chanters; #340 a bagpipe with 2 pairs of drones; #360 a "protobagpipe" with the player playing 2 "shawms" at the same time; #60 looks like 3 pipes in a common stock, but no bag; #260 a bagpipe with a chanter but no drones; #280 a bagpipe with a chanter and drone in a common stock (or so it appears).

In his excellent book "The Secrets of the Galician Bagpipe" Xose Lois Foxo maintains that Galicia in the early Middle Ages was the most important center of bagpiping in Europe, with influence spreading from Galicia along the Camino de Santiago de Compostela. I think the original title of his book is "Os Segredos da Gaita."

Art
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Re: Galician, Asturian etc short info needed

Post by Art » Wed Feb 17, 2010 2:07 am

Thanks for the link to the Cantigas de Santa Maria: Illuminations. Very interesting!

I don't remember now who said this, but I think someone cautioned me to take the claims in Os Segredos with a grain of salt. I don't know whether Os Segredos is jingoism or scholarship, but it's old enough to be suspect.

I suppose it's plausible that as the end of the Camino de Santiago, Galicia could have been a major gaita center, no matter whether Galicia was the origin of the spread of gaitas or just one of the receiving areas.

There has been a good deal of wishful thinking and misinformation published about gaitas. Even the Asturian government's 1984 (I think) publication, "La Gaita Asturiana: Método para su aprendizaje," had a ridiculous chapter on the history of the gaita.

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finngaitero
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Re: Galician, Asturian etc short info needed

Post by finngaitero » Wed Feb 17, 2010 1:07 pm

Great thanks alot.This what I'm just looking for ..good links and opinnions...together with personal pipers touch.
Thanks.
Mikko

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